Saturday, 3 April 2021

But 'Tis Not Chocolate!

The Local Low-Cal Egg
a.k.a. Zhang Yangen, Sea's Nest, 2012

In other disappointments, the Hot Cross Buns this year are a failure. I fear I killed the yeast as I was a bit distracted by trying to watch Imeneo when I should have been simply listening whilst multitasking in the kitchen. There shan't be an accompanying pic as any fule kno what Rock Cakes look like. Not to worry, there are only twelve to get through and I'll give it another shot next week. 

Meanwhile, it is most definitely autumn around these parts for this is the sight that gladdens the eye when we go to the park now:


It was rather busy in the park as the weather was Glorious yesterday. But we found a park bench in the shade behind this sweep of Anemone hupehensis and settled in for a read. We were near enough to watch the passing parade of dog-walkers, pedallers and pedestrians but secluded enough to be just us and a family of foraging magpies on this bit of grass. 


While Mr. P was busy with spies, I found myself suitably sun-dressed for my choice:


Image credits: Flying With Hands

25 comments:

  1. I admire you greatly for even attempting to make Hot Cross buns. Hot Cross buns are piled high in the shops here currently, and are very cheap to buy. Apparently Aldi have 10 differently flavoured buns this year from salted caramel to rhubarb & custard - the mind boggles. Enjoy your Easter break in the balmy Australian sunshine.

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  2. Rosemary: The reason I've taken to making my own is that I find much to criticise in the shoppe variety and can customise my own with favoured fruity bits. The downside of taking one's eye off the baking ball, however, is even worse-than-shoppe results, hahah! While I do anyways like my fruit choices in my, ahem, rock cakes, I think Aldi are just getting silly with theirs! I hope you're enjoying your HCBs and a lovely spring Easter, too. xx

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  3. Hello Pipistrello, I like the large metallic egg, but am not sure that it needed the interior smaller one. If you have read the book, perhaps you can let us know the difference between a German garden and a regular one.
    --Jim

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  4. Jim: What I can tell you is that a Pomeranian garden is sandy-soiled, summer-drought afflicted and feels the full effect of four proper seasons. And when you are a late C19th Lady Gardener in an old family estate, your dreams are made reality by Russian and Polish labourers. The result, in this instance, differs nought from most rose-filled, flower and veggie gardens outside of the tropics!

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  5. As I know that my wife will not read this, I can admit here that her 2021 Hot Cross Buns were also a tad 'heavy'. Still OK, but they didn't rise as they should have. Sounds like an international problem.

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  6. Crisis International! Perhaps Aldi is behind this. We shall keep Lady M’s offerings between ourselves, in the meantime.

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  7. That looks like a very good bit of park to be stranded. My mum's copy of Elizabeth and her German Garden was so old it fell to bits, I think it must have been a first edition! But still I hadn't read it. I think I will, having read the quote in your commonplace book. I must try again to find a way to subscribe to your blog, I am perfectly hopeless at figuring out how to do such things but there has to be a way. I already a follower but it never comes up on my notifications.

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  8. Cute...the passing parade of dog-walkers, pedallers and pedestrians :) That is so true. Since my beloved black lab died of old age, it hardly seems worthwhile going for a walk in the local park. As soon as my new labrador puppy arrives, the twice daily walks will start again.

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  9. Jenny: Do take the old edition in hand and read it before too long, it's a lovely book! As to the mechanics of following, I do really just wing it and put the recommended Options on the sidebar on this blog, but don't on my others as I like to keep them looking nice & tidy. As to how it all works, or not, it's rather mysterious and I feel it might just fall in a crashing heap one day :) Meanwhile, Visitors are always welcome, however they pop by!

    Hels: A new puppy coming? There has been a hatching in our area, too. You'll be surrounded by frolicking fur balls when you get back to your park, without doubt!

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  10. I've never attempted Hot Cross Buns but have heard it through the grapevine that they are rather temperamental to make and often end up closer in consistency to Rock Buns. So, you are not alone.

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  11. Loree: Temperamental, indeed! I shall not have them defeat me this year, however, and the next batch will be fluffy risen miracles, come what may.

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  12. Autumn is such a lovely time of year .... we are at the beginning of Spring which is also beautiful.
    I have just eaten two Hot Cross Buns ... I took the easy route and bought them from Marks and Spencer ­čĄú­čśé­čĄú !!! I just looked up your book .... it sounds good. She said “ I believe all needlework and dressmaking is of the devil, designed to keep women from study “. I believe she was right !!! XXXX

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  13. Jackie: M&S to the rescue! We're still soldiering on with the dozen rocks :) Yes, the book is a little treasure and she is full of Pearls to share. It's almost hard to believe it was written 120 years ago! xx

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  14. KUDO's to YOU for even TRYING!
    I bought cinnamon snails as we call them here in THE USA........full of GLUTEN!
    I inhaled mine............and FACED THE CONSEQUENCES!!!
    IT WAS WORTH IT!

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  15. Interesting sculpture. Lovely flowers. Perhaps you need to share your recipe for Cold Rock Buns.

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  16. Contessa: Snails are pretty delicious, too! I've not resorted to making them as on the rare occasion when the urge overtakes, we've an excellent French patisserie five mins walk away. xx

    Andrew: First kill your yeast ... Instructions beyond that appear not to be on the FWH box!

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  17. I like the navy/lemon dress. Looking forward to summer dresses. In fact, reading "it is most definitely autumn" triggered a momentary panic in me.
    I have not attempted Hot Cross Buns, nor even ever eaten one, but I'll just say you are wise to make reasonably sized batches. I have a bad tendency to double everything, which means twice as many Rock Baked Goods if it goes awry.
    Did an Easter egg hunt for my way-too-old-for-it kid, who was delighted. Also gave my renovator a package of eggs from the fancy chocolatier. The look on his face was priceless. So much joy, and chocolate is a legal drug!

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  18. ToF: An Easter Egg hunt! What fun for any age. Apologies for nearly causing anxiety over the space time continuum, it can be a tricky beast.

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  19. When my recipes flop I try to remakes them soon to figure out what went wrong and take notes for next time
    I hope you next batch is better.

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  20. Ur-spo: One more shot allowed for the foreseeable, lest HCB fatigue sets in!

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  21. You are brave to take on baking cakes. My baking skills are very limited and I have had more misses than winning outcomes. Your park sounds delightful with beautiful flowers on a perfect sunny day.

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  22. Susan: I do take the Nothing Ventured approach to the culinary world but bursts of creativity are not a constant in that department. Nor would prizes be awarded at the agricultural fairs!

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  23. Dear Pipistrello, I love especially two things you mention in your post: the anemone hupehensis (especially the more difficult to cultivate white Honorine Jobert) - and of course "Elizabeth and her German Garden" - I read it in English, but there is a very fine translation into German too with her husband as "der Grimmige", well done! (You know her book "All my dogs" - hahaha, a funny way to parade all your husbands to your readers!)
    Always wen I read it (at least once a year - as "Enchanted April", that one together with DVD - I get hungry for a simple meal of bread & butter & radishes...

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  24. Britta: Who could not love these massed anemones? No whites, I’m afraid, and what are out of frame are the camellia sasanquas in flower against the tennis courts, all making a very pretty corner of the park ... Now I did not know there is a DVD in the offing of EVA’a delights! Off to investigate :)

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